Tag Archives: communication

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Quita Docking (right) pictured with best friend Cody Hollingsworth before her accident. (Supplied: Gladys Docking)

It’s the silent, unspoken killer amongst us, striking from nowhere, changing everything in a single heartbeat.

The rugby tackle that was too high. A joyride gone awry. An accident on the farm. Simply running out of luck.

Acquired brain injury is the leading killer of people under 45 years in Australia. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

It has been almost ten years since traumatic brain injury (TBI) crashed into our lives, changing our family forever. People always ask, “How is your son Paul doing now? How are you, your husband, the other kids? How has your family survived?” I usually give my polite, standard answer: “Oh…thanks for asking, we’re all doing fine. And you?” But the reality is — unless you have experienced the loss, the heartache, and the ripple effects that brain injury can inflict — TO READ WHAT THE REALITY IS CLICK HERE

Paul-Coskie

Paul-Coskie

 

Once we have successfully learned how to read, it continues to be easy for most of us. But for some people it can be an immense challenge. In developmental dyslexia, the process of learning to read is disrupted, while in alexia – or acquired dyslexia – brain damage can affect reading ability in previously literate adults.

dyslexia2

Patients with pure alexia lose the ability to read fluently following injury to areas in the rear part of the left hemisphere of their brain. The curious thing is that they can still walk, talk, think, and even write like they did before their injury. They just can’t read. Not even what they have written themselves.  CLICK HERE TO READ MORE.

An advocacy group is calling for budget funding for early intervention services for acquired brain injury, a condition which can lead to domestic violence.

early intervention services for acquired brain injury

The frontal lobe, which can be affected by acquired brain injury, is involved in regulating how people react to their emotions.

The condition affects the frontal lobe and can cause limited patience as well as aggressive and violent behaviour. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

Evaluation of conjugate eye movements has been a key component of the neurologic examination for at least 3500 years. Concussions are typically associated with post-traumatic vision problems, such as difficulty with reading, visual accommodation, and saccadic eye movements. Eye tracking dysfunction is one objective measure of concussion, but methods of tracking have not been well refined, and even so, require highly skilled examiners, and have never been translated into the ED environment.

Eye tracking    CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

My Traumatic Brain Injury… Meet Diego

Alfred Health’s Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation Centre opened at Caulfield Hospital in September 2014 and the Institute for Safety, Compensation and Recovery Research (ISCRR) has been there every step of the way to support new research that promises to advance care for patients, like 29-year-old Diego Mercado.  

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The driving forces behind rehabilitation research at the Centre are researchers like Associate Professor Natasha Lannin, from La Trobe University and Alfred Health, and staff at the Centre such as Katrina Neave, Nurse Manager. Their desire to make interventions for people with Acquired Brain Injury even better, allowing many more people to resume the activities they did before they had the injury. This is inspirational research and both say their motivation comes from the patients who will benefit from the research. Patients like Diego Mercado.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

Holiday Challenges With a Brain Injury

Holiday Challenges With a Brain Injury

We are now in the middle of the holiday season which can challenge those of us with an injured brain.    It is a time when so much more is expected of us than most other times of the year.    We along with our loved ones, friends and caregivers should all remember that it’s best to simplify so we can enjoy things more.     It’s been nearly 9 years since my brain injury and I’m doing much better but I have to remind myself to keep things simple instead of doing  all the things I “should” do, or the things I did before my injury.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

Glowing Christmas Tree in Snow

Amy Edmunds, a stroke survivor, is a globally  recognised advocate of young adult stroke  patients. Her group – YoungStroke, Inc., is a 501 c3  non-profit advocacy organisation that evolved from  her graduate research to extend understanding of  the stroke experience among young adults and their
caregivers.

Referring to young stroke survivors in her  article “Speak Up and Speak Out”, she says:

When stroke leaves a young adult with aphasia,  the sudden loss of ability to communicate  imposes hardships upon social and workplace  relationships which differ from geriatric stroke  survivors.

Social relationships are often honed during  early adulthood as interpersonal evolve during  dating and early marriage. Young adults who  experience aphasia may forfeit opportunities to  build such meaningful, committed relations due  to their inability to effectively express emotions
. . . in addition to managing other deficits  imposed by stroke. In contrast, many  geriatric survivors have already experienced  such relationships. Additionally, many have  nurtured long-lasting friendships and raised  children into adulthood.

Amy adds:

Globally,  young  stroke  survivors  are  an emerging  population driven by epidemics of  obesity, hypertension and diabetes. Within six  years, nearly two million Americans who have  suffered a stroke or brain injury will be  living with aphasia according to  the
American      Speech-Language      Hearing      Association.

The growth in survivors – with stroke or  stroke resulting in aphasia, correlates with  the formation and growth of     Facebook groups  specifically for young adults (ages 18 to 50 of  age).

Here we identify some of the leading groups for  young people with stroke and aphasia.
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